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Basement Renovation Cost

Basement Renovation Cost

Here is a breakdown of cost by phase for my basement. Keep in mind I was my own labor, general contractor, etc.  This does not include books, permits or tools.  You can see all of the details including my exact budget in the “basement cost estimator” which you can get by subscribing to the newsletter. CostPercentageFraming1,0007.0%Electrical1,50010.5%Audio/Visual3002.1%Bathroom2,50017.6%Flooring1,50010.5%Drywall2,65018.6%Trim and Doors2,00014.1%Paint1,0007.0%How to save on the cost of a basementYou do the painting –  I know.  Painting sucks.  But pool tables don’t, they’re awesome.  And if you did your own painting you’d save enough to buy a pool table.Do your own trim-work.  A little further up on the “handy” scale, I realize this. But you only need a mitre saw, a nail gun and 3 or 4 weekends. When you’re done you can use those tools to build yourself a sweet little basement bar with the money you saved.Be your own general contractor and you can save big on the cost of a basement. You don’t have to do all the work, just coordinate all the trades, design and scheduling. You might be able to save 8-10k on average.Buy re-conditioned tools  –  Used power tools are 30-50% cheaper and in my experience work equally as well as new tools. I only buy reconditioned tools.”Follow the big dog” Say What? One of my best tips for saving money on the cost of a basement and it’s free to anyone who signs up for the newsletter.Basement Cost Estimator v1.5
basement renovation cost 1

Basement Renovation Cost

Hi Jason I’ve spent this Friday evening looking at basement-y stuff, and I have to say, I’m so glad that I came across your great website! I’ve been reading comments for the last hour and I was wondering if I could get some advice. We are hoping to build a new ranch home. The basement will wind up being 600 unfinished and 1200 potentially finished. However, getting all of the basement goodies that I want is out of the question, given price constraints. A full finish isn’t going to happen now…but I would like to DIY in the coming years. I definitely want to set it up for a full finish in the future, even if 10 years from now. So, what is the most important thing that I need to have right now to set up for a future DIY finish? Where do you think I should draw the line that divides the needs from the wants? Since builders are cheaper, which of the following 11 items will cause the future Greg to be very pleased with past Greg? 1. Full Framed/Insulated Basement 2. Full Electrical Basement 3. Pre Plumb Bathroom 4. Full lighting 5. Full Bathroom 6. Full Basement Drywall only 7. Pre Plumb Wet Bar 8. Radiant Heat Basement 9. Full Basement Trim and Doors 10. Full Basement Taping, Mudding, Texturing, and Finishing. 11. Full Wet Bar Also, do you have a positive opinion about geothermal? I’m in Iowa. Thanks, Jason. Best wishes. PS Oh, and I’m pro geothermal in just about all cases of new construction in cold weather climates.
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Basement Renovation Cost

I have an existing home that is on a crawl space. We have a floor that is in need of support. We were planning on going in and adding support under that area. But I am thinking instead of just fixing the sinking floor I would like to go in and dig out the crawl space and make it into a basement. When I searched ‘what would it cost to put a basement under an existing house’ your website was one that popped up. Your numbers here are for finishing an existing basement, correct? Can anyone direct me to a website that can give me info on what is involved in putting a basement under an existing home? The area is 480 sq ft approx, it would be a partial basement. I live in the Kansas City area. Thanks!
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Basement Renovation Cost

My grandparents did something similar to this. They built their house and had the basement, rudimentary kitchen, outer walls, and roof completed first. The first floor was there but it is was completely unfinished on the inside. They lived in the basement (which was partially above ground so they had some natural light) while they finished the upstairs. Would you really save that much over the long term anyway I wonder? It seems like it makes more sense to do like my grandparents and frame out the upstairs while you have builders out there anyway. Also, you’d have to build your roof and kitchen twice if you only did the basement. Mind you, my grandparents did this without having to finance it. When the banks get involved they have rules of their own. Getting a mortgage is more difficult these days and I doubt any bank would finance a “basement only” house. The way they look at it, they need to be able to sell it if you default (not that you would, but that’s how they look at it) and they would never be able to sell a basement with no house. Of course, I could be totally wrong but talk to mortgage specialists to see if your idea is going to work from that angle.
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Basement Renovation Cost

Keep It Dry Check for any water issues in your basement before beginning the planning process. Obvious signs are pools of water or drips coming through the below-grade walls. Check outside to make sure the ground is graded away from your foundation. Also look for cracks in your foundation walls and repair that damage if necessary. Know the Code After you’ve taken care of any moisture problems and have come up with your plan, it’s time to check with your local municipality to see if you’ll be required to get any permits. This is particularly important if you’re planning plumbing and electrical work, which may have to be inspected. Consider the Fasteners Basement walls and floors are generally some sort of masonry, cement, block or brick, and a regular ‘ol nail or screw isn’t going to cut it when attaching framing. You’ll need to get the proper fastener and possibly anchors for your wall type. In some cases, you may need to rent a powder-actuated fastener, sometimes referred to as a shotgun fastener. These are similar to a shotgun in that they use a charge to fire a fastener into concrete. Add a Vapor Barrier Even after taking care of any moisture issues, your basement can become a damp place. You’ll need to add a vapor barrier to both the walls and floors prior to framing and finishing off these surfaces. It’s a good idea to lay down a vapor barrier for a day or two, then check underneath to see if and how much moisture may be coming through before continuing. Create an Offset Space Despite all efforts, even with a vapor barrier, moisture can still be an issue. Create a slight offset from the outside wall by adding thin slats of wood or metal called furring strips. These strips can also be used to help level out a wall that may be “wavy” to create a flat surface for adding framing. Keep Out the Cold and the Warmth In Insulation will not only help control the temperature inside your basement, it may also add another layer of moisture control, as well as help dampen sound from the outside. Choose an insulation that includes a vapor barrier on both sides. Other options include a spray foam insulation. Be sure to check code requirements for this type. Drop Ceilings Provide Easy Access A drop, or suspended, ceiling offers a way to both conceal and provide access to electrical and plumbing lines via the removable tiles. You may have a preconceived notion that such a ceiling will look more like an office than a home, but there are plenty of attractive options available. These ceilings will reduce the amount of overhead space available, so keep that in mind when planning. Give Your Lighting a Recess Recessed lighting in a basement is a good option, because they won’t take up valuable overhead space that a light fixture would. Plus, it’s easy to install with a drop ceiling. Add Some Warmth at the Baseboards Warm air rises, so it makes sense to install heating vents at floor level. Baseboard heating is a good option, but make sure it makes sense for your plan and is easy to tie into your existing HVAC system. For a finished space, you want to make sure you’re not relying on space heaters, so plan carefully. The Utility Room is Not for Finishing Keep the space housing an HVAC unit or units and water heaters clear, open, and unfinished. These spaces have specific code requirements for spacing and framing, plus you’ll need access for inspection and/or repairs. You may be tempted to finish off this area, but keep it simple to avoid problems later.
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Basement Renovation Cost

Hi Jason. Thanks for providing this information. Here’s a question for you. We have a 500 sq ft finished basement that we plan to renovate. The basement already has a bathroom, but we’re thinking of moving the bathroom to the opposite side of the basement. Assume that we’d keep the existing toilet, sink, etc. About how much might it cost to relocate the bathroom? I’m specifically wondering how much it would cost to run the new plumbing connections. The new bathroom would be adjacent to the crawlspace, so the new connections would be short. Cheers, David

Basement Renovation Cost

Basement Renovation Cost

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